Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Review

In case the link that I shared with you, in the previous post was a little overwhelming, here are some of the main points, that I wanted you to see.

“Perhaps the boldest thing, the most revolutionary change the Church ever did, happened in the first century. The holy day, the Sabbath, was changed from Saturday to Sunday.

“The Day of the Lord” (dies Dominica) was chosen, not from any directions noted in the Scriptures, but from the Church’s [Roman Catholic] sense of its own power; the day of resurrection, the day of Pentecost, fifty days later, came on the first day of the week. So this would be the new Sabbath. People who thing that the Scriptures should be the sole authority, should logically become 7th Day Adventist, and keep Saturday holy.”

Source: The Pastor's page of the Sentinel, Saint Catherine Catholic Church, Algonac, Michigan, May 21, 1995.

Here is another Catholic Catechism that agrees the change from Saturday to Sunday has no scriptural authority:

“Q. Have you any other way of proving that the Church has power to institute festivals of precept?

A. Had she not such power, she could not have done that in which all modern religionists agree with her;—she could not have substituted the observance of Sunday the first day of the week, for the observance of Saturday the seventh day, a change for which there is no Scriptural authority."

[pg. 181]

"Q. In what manner can we show a Protestant, that he speaks unreasonably against fasts and abstinences?

A. Ask him why he keeps Sunday, and not Saturday, as his day of rest, since he is unwilling either to fast or to abstain. If he reply, that the Scripture orders him to keep the Sunday, but says nothing as to fasting and abstinence, tell him the Scripture speaks of Saturday or the Sabbath, but gives no command anywhere regarding Sunday or the first day of the week. If, then, he neglects Saturday as a day of rest and holiness, and substitutes Sunday in its place, and this merely because such was the usage of the ancient Church, should he not, if he wishes to act consistently, observe fasting and abstinence, because the ancient Church so ordained?”

Source: A Doctrinal Catechism by Stephen Keenan, Imprimatur by John Cardinal McCloskey, Archbishop of New York, Published by P. J. Kennedy and Sons, New York, Copyright 1876 by T. W. Strong, pages 174, 181.