Friday, March 10, 2017

Fabricated Training

What does it mean to “fabricate” the truth of a matter? It means to reconstruct the truth in any manner that you desire it to be seen or accepted; “to make up something that is not true” – Encarta Dictionary: English (North America). It doesn’t matter to the “fabricator” whether or not the reality of a matter is realized or not; as a matter of fact, they would rather the truth never surfaced; they just want their version of the ‘truth’ to be accepted as the “real thing.”

Now let us define training: the English (US) Thesaurus states it as; “teaching, guidance, education, instruction, preparation.” Hence, when we put our title together – fabricated training – we find that somebody has been “teaching a lie.”

It breaks my heart to tell you that in the Christian church, there has been ‘fabricated training’ going on, ever since Constantine the Great joined the Christian church.

Many people fail to realize that Christianity emerged after the Ceremonial laws (those dealing with animal sacrifices) of Judaism were nullified. With the death of Christ, the need to offer sacrifices for sin stopped! Jesus, the “Lamb of God” (John 1:29) died for the sins of all who were willing to accept Him as the Messiah/Savior. The eleven disciples that were left (one disciple, Judas, betrayed him and then hanged himself – Matthew 27:1-5), along with some other disciples, amounting to 120 persons – Acts 1:12-15 – constituted the beginning of the church.
On the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:1-4; 41) 3,000 more persons were added to the church, which grew the church immediately. Then on a daily basis, God added to the church persons who sought for ‘truth’. These people were mostly Jews from at least 17 different regions surrounding Jerusalem (Acts 2:5-11). However, after other Jews, who opposed the teaching of Jesus/Yashua as being the Messiah stoned a leading Jewish Christian to death, by the name of Stephen (Acts 7:57-60), God chose a man named Saul, who changed his name to Paul, to promote Christianity among non-Jews or gentiles (Romans 11:13).

Even during the life of Saul, which was during the first century AD, there were those brethren in the church, who opposed the truth about Jesus. Paul (II Thessalonians 2:1-12) and the Apostle John (I John 4:3) called them “Anti Christs”. The word ‘anti’ can be used in two ways: 1) to be against, or 2) to be in place of – there were both kinds. However, the one who proved to be more dangerous to the church was the one who was – in the place of.

Consequently, when Constantine joined the Christian church, he called upon members in leadership to make some changes to the things they were teaching, because they conflicted with what he wanted to do. Instead of Constantine conforming to the teachings of the church, as outlined by the apostles (Galatians 1:8-9), he wished to hold on to his pagan practices. He believed that he had the power to change God’s law.

Therefore, wishing to continue worshipping on the first day of the week, like his pagan practice had him doing – venerating the sun – he told the Christian church to switch from worshipping on the seventh-day of the week, and worship on the first. He believed that if they did that, more pagans would join the Christian church just as he had done.

Therefore, since he was over the state, he could order the church to do whatever he wanted them to do. Consequently, he ordered the following edict on March 3, 321 AD:

On the venerable day of the Sun let the magistrates and people residing in cities rest, and let all workshops be closed. In the country however persons engaged in agriculture may freely and lawfully continue their pursuits because it often happens that another day is not suitable for grain-sowing or vine planting; lest by neglecting the proper moment for such operations the bounty of heaven should be lost. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord's_Day#Origins_of_Sunday_worship-reference)

This will be continued, in the next post. Until then, please investigate the following links:

www.gingersworld.net
 My Death Poem